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WW100 Resources

Posted by Tracey Butler on 23 April 2015 | 0 Comments

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As part of our core business at NZMS we get to see and handle some incredible items and images. Over the last few months, with the countdown to the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landing, many of the amazing things we have seen have related to WW1 - and the experiences of the men and women abroad.

From the soldier's diary that was small enough to keep tucked inside his boot, the many collections of letters sent back home, the watercolours painted by soldiers overseas, and the photograph albums of the soldiers and nurses who answered the call 100 years ago, the team all feel a special connection to these pieces of history.

WW100 Resources online

WW100Some clients have made their digital collections accessible online. Some of their sites are dedicated entirely to WW1 history while others have some WW1 items as components of a much larger collection - and all of them have some unique and interesting items to explore.

Here's a guide to what you might find:

National Army Museum

The nam.recollect.co.nz website is all about WW1 - and includes photograph albums from soldiers and nurses over the 1914 - 1918 war period. You can choose to browse an album page by page, or get a close up look at some of the individual photographs from the albums. You might also be interested in reading their Chronology of War.

Our Boys, your stories

To mark the centenary of the First World War, Auckland Libraries and Auckland Council Archives created Our boys, your stories, to help people discover and share their collections of portraits of soldiers taken before their departure. They also have the RSA journal Quick March (1918-1923) online, allowing you to read first hand reports from the front lines.

Upper Hutt City Libraries 

UHCL has a large and varied collection, but as part of the centenary commemorations they have created a specific section for WW1 history as it relates to Upper Hutt and surrounds. Upper Hutt featured heavily in WW1 history with Trentham Camp used as a training and major embarkation point for recruits from the lower North, and upper South Islands. See maps, photographs, and letters and diaries in this featured collection.

Also, check out the site dedicated to the Historic Trentham Rifle Ranges

Smaller Collections

Lincoln University has a section dedicated to its own WW1 Roll of Honour, including portraits of students after enlistment in NZ and overseas.

Wanganui Library has a series of letters and telegrams from officers of the 7th Wellington West Coast Regiment, members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force and a family member. Except for two letters, they are addressed to the Commanding Officer of the 7th Wellington West Coast Regiment, Wanganui, Lieutenant Colonel R. Hughes. Four letters are available online now, with more to be released over time 

Feilding Public Library has photographs from early ANZAC Day services, Armistice celebrations in 1919, and even a photograph of Keith Little, who is said to have first coined the ANZAC acronym.

Bringing History to Life

Our company feels privileged to have done our small part in making some of this history accessible - whether to a private (eg family) group, or to the world at large. It allows the many individual stories to be told and heard 100 years later, bringing history to life through the pictures and words of those who lived it.

I think one of may personal favourites is this set of photographs from the ANZAC Day Games (1917) in England - maybe you could recreate a few of the activities with your family and friends this ANZAC weekend.

For more information about WW100 projects, exhibitions and events in your area, visit ww100.govt.nz.

WW100cabinet2
The NZMS/DI foyer display has a WW100 focus at the moment.  All the items were donated from the private collections of the directors and team members of NZMS and sister company Desktop Imaging. 

WW100cabinet1

 

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